What Make The Critics Of Netflix’ New David Fincher Serial Killer Series MINDHUNTER??


What Make The Critics Of Netflix’ New David Fincher Serial Killer Series MINDHUNTER?? …
TV Guide says:
… Time says:
… USA Today says:
… These days, an in the realm of streaming, that deviant in itself — and it makes me curious enough to press onward and see what lies in wait for Ford, Tench and a nation on the cusp of a frightening new age. The first two episodes feel almost deliberately incomplete, begging for something bigger to arrive. Netflix’ “House of Cards” producer-director David Fincher, whose serial-killer resume includes “Seven” and “Zodiac,” directs the first two of the 1970s-set “Mindhunter” episodes. the series’ linking of irrational times and unspeakable acts resonates with today’s stories of mass shootings and a widening gyre of chaos in the headlines. superior new drama … This is no bleeding-heart show — it’s on the side of law enforcement and incarceration. Read the full article on AICN

I am – Hercules!! An unusually cerebral and chillingly

Finish the article on AICN overall, the series lacks sharpness. …
The New York Times says:
… Perhaps something of a very unofficial prequel to “Red Dragon” and “Silence of the Lambs,” “Mindhunter” (not be be confused with Michael Mann’s 1986 serial-killer thriller “Manhunter”) comes to us from screenwriter Joe Penhall, who adapted Cormac McCarthy’s post-apocalyptic novel “The Road” into the 2009 Viggo Mortenson movie. But Mindhunter’s underlying belief, that the enemy ought to be respected and known, feels almost radical. …
Salon says:
… In choosing to accentuate the cerebral nature of horror over visceral displays, at least at first, “Mindhunter” departs from the standard approach to such lurid subject matter.